Top 5 Controversial Songs of 2013

Michael Wright/ Fayes Vision

Michael Wright/ Fayes Vision

Megan Vaillancourt, Professional Procrastinator

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






 

With 2013 in our past, it’s important to take a look at some of the music that made it memorable. 2013 birthed many songs that have inspired excitement, but more importantly, controversy. Ultra pop hits from the sounds of Robin Thicke and Miley Cyrus raided the airways and took annoying refuge in our minds.  The words, “Wrecking Ball” and “Blurred Lines” became constants in the vocabulary of people across North America. Let’s take a look at the wondrous musical productions that have made it into the top five.

5.        Starting off our list is the self-titled “Queen Bee” herself, Beyoncé and her so called ‘feminist’ track,“Bow Down” Debuting originally on Beyoncé’s Tumblr Blog, the rack come out in early 2013.  Queen Bee has a past history of songs that aim to empower women, from “Run The World”, and “Me Myself and I”. Unfortunately, this charming little song falls short of that status according to many fans. The song’s message is supposedly geared toward not seeing Beyoncé as “Jay-Z’s wife”, although it blatantly uses the word, “bit**”, which many find demeaning to women, even in the context of the song. The song sparked outrage even before it was officially released. Her fans became divided down the middle as to whether the track demeaned women and was blatantly offensive, or containing a hidden meaning. Due to the past music released by this ultra-popular woman, the song definitely got people talking.

 

4.         Coming in at number four is Miley Cyrus’s ultra-controversial music video for her song, “Wrecking Ball”. Without looking at the video, the lyrics to this song aren’t much to make a fuss about, “I came in like a wrecking ball, I never hit so hard in love”; a typical breakup song sums it up at best. It wasn’t until

Cyrus released her video which prominently features her swinging naked on a wrecking ball that seemingly all of America went into an uproar over her nudity and explicitness. Cyrus was blamed for being a poor role model for her younger fans by being so exposed in her music videos. Her racy and suggestive movements were not taken positively and critics everywhere deemed it “inappropriate”. The former bubblegum sweet and innocent Cyrus was no longer, and it was apparent many people weren’t ready to let that image of her die.

 

3.   At number three we have “U.O. E.N.O” by rapper Rocko. The entire song isn’t controversial, but what made it so was an included verse by famous rapper Rick Ross. Upon the initial release, the verse flew under the radar, until a month after listeners realized the references to rape in Rick Ross’s verse: “Put molly all in her champagne, she ain’t even know it / I took her home and I enjoyed that / She ain’t even know it.” The blatant reference to rape through dropping a date rape drug in a woman’s drink and later raping her, left listeners in shock. The song gained so much flack and debate that ultimately Ross’s verse was dropped from the song, and Ross even lost an endorsement deal with Reebok.

 

2.            Miley Cyrus makes her way onto this list for the second time at number two with her earlier hit, “We Can’t Stop”. Not only were the lyrics to her song controversial, her accompanying music video made it much worse. Her song describes taking drugs and partying, in particular the drug Molly. It seems as though this drug has made its way into several songs such as the previous one in our list. The line, “And everyone in line for the bathroom / trying to get a line in the bathroom” refers to doing cocaine. The mention of drugs throughout the song, and in the video caused many people to yet again, blame Miley Cyrus for being a terrible role model for young fans. Cyrus is again scantily clad, although not completely naked as she was in “Wrecking Ball”. The music video follows no real plot line, but rather depicts a “drug trip” with psychedelic images displayed. The general theme is that the partying can’t stop, and that physically people won’t stop what they are doing. No doubt this was a publicity booster by Cyrus, but nonetheless, a controversial one.

 

 1.             Finally at number one we have the slightly older version of Justin Timberlake, Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines”. This song is number one because it took the radio waves with such force it became the chart topper everywhere for a considerable amount of time. The original video features women running around topless and barely covered anywhere else as Robin Thicke sings about glorifying rape culture, by claiming, “you know you want it”. Initially the lyrics weren’t recognized as disgusting, until many equality rights movements got wind of the horrendous song and blasted the message out into the Internet. The song describes the ‘blurred’ consent lines that many people experience in society, and that women always ‘want’ it, and it’s Robin Thicke’s job to “domesticate” them. The song confirms the strong rape culture we live in and continue to support. Not only did the song blow up due to its lyrics, it sounded scarily close to Marvin Gaye’s “Got to Give It Up”. Thicke ended up paying an out of court settlement to Gaye’s family, but the whole incident just fueled the controversial fire of this song throughout 2013.

 

By simply observing the reoccurring themes in the songs that came out in 2013, you can see that drugs, rape, and social injustices run rampant throughout them. These ideas are usually controversial, and are most likely what lead to the popularity of the aforementioned tracks. All people talked about were Miley Cyrus and the circus that followed her around this past year in tabloids, the Internet and Television. 2013 was chalk-full of controversy, music taking a big role in it. Do people secretly enjoy the controversy that follows the music industry? Or are people truly concerned about what this says about our society? What is known for sure is that there is a trend of producing controversial songs for the sake of money and time in the spotlight; this list highlighting those that rose to the top.

Print Friendly

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Top 5 Controversial Songs of 2013

    Top Stories

    Desensitization of Slurs

  • Top 5 Controversial Songs of 2013

    Science & Technology

    Sacrificial Lambs

  • Top 5 Controversial Songs of 2013

    Music

    Hip-Hop Was Snubbed Again, But It’s Not Surprising

  • Top 5 Controversial Songs of 2013

    Sports

    Olympics at Sochi

  • Top 5 Controversial Songs of 2013

    Opinions

    The Death of Jaime Coots, and the Important Question it Leads us to Ask

  • Top 5 Controversial Songs of 2013

    Science & Technology

    Social Media and Language

  • Top 5 Controversial Songs of 2013

    Top Stories

    Same-sex Marriage Equality Sooner rather than Later

  • Top 5 Controversial Songs of 2013

    Sports

    Harden Rockets Out Of Oklahoma

  • Top Stories

    A Young Activist and Her Act of Courage:

  • Top 5 Controversial Songs of 2013

    Opinions

    A Minority of the Regular, A Majority of the Gifted

Top 5 Controversial Songs of 2013